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Reisterstown | Columbia | Baltimore

Monday, 23 March 2020 00:00

Located on the bottom of the foot, there is a large portion of tissue that connects the heel to the toes. This is known as the plantar fascia, and if it becomes inflamed, the condition known as plantar fasciitis may develop. This condition can occur for a variety of reasons. These can include standing for extended periods of time throughout the day on a hard surface, participating in running or jumping activities, or from wearing shoes that do not fit correctly. Common symptoms that are often associated with plantar fasciitis can include swelling, severe pain after arising in the morning, and it may be difficult to walk. You may find relief when proper foot stretches are performed, and when the affected foot is elevated, as this may help to diminish existing swelling. It is suggested that you consult with a podiatrist if you experience any symptoms of plantar fasciitis.

Plantar fasciitis is a common foot condition that is often caused by a strain injury. If you are experiencing heel pain or symptoms of plantar fasciitis, contact Dr. Mark Spier from Maryland. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is Plantar Fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis is one of the most common causes of heel pain. The plantar fascia is a ligament that connects your heel to the front of your foot. When this ligament becomes inflamed, plantar fasciitis is the result. If you have plantar fasciitis you will have a stabbing pain that usually occurs with your first steps in the morning. As the day progresses and you walk around more, this pain will start to disappear, but it will return after long periods of standing or sitting.

What Causes Plantar Fasciitis?

  • Excessive running
  • Having high arches in your feet
  • Other foot issues such as flat feet
  • Pregnancy (due to the sudden weight gain)
  • Being on your feet very often

There are some risk factors that may make you more likely to develop plantar fasciitis compared to others. The condition most commonly affects adults between the ages of 40 and 60. It also tends to affect people who are obese because the extra pounds result in extra stress being placed on the plantar fascia.

Prevention

  • Take good care of your feet – Wear shoes that have good arch support and heel cushioning.
  • Maintain a healthy weight
  • If you are a runner, alternate running with other sports that won’t cause heel pain

There are a variety of treatment options available for plantar fasciitis along with the pain that accompanies it. Additionally, physical therapy is a very important component in the treatment process. It is important that you meet with your podiatrist to determine which treatment option is best for you.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Columbia, Reisterstown, and Locust Point, MD. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

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Monday, 16 March 2020 00:00

The pain that is associated with cuboid syndrome is generally felt on the outer side of the foot. This condition is known to be common among ballet dancers and athletes, and can develop due to performing repetitive movements. Additionally, it may occur from having had a foot injury, such as stepping off a curb unexpectedly, or twisting your ankle. Symptoms of this condition can include redness surrounding the point of injury, swelling in the ankle, and you may experience difficulty walking or moving the toes. Patients have found mild relief when the affected foot is elevated, as this may be helpful in reducing a portion of the swelling. If you feel you have cuboid syndrome, it is suggested that you consult with a podiatrist who can prescribe you custom orthotics, which may be beneficial in facilitating a speedy recovery.

Cuboid syndrome, also known as cuboid subluxation, occurs when the joints and ligaments near the cuboid bone in the foot become torn. If you have cuboid syndrome, consult with Dr. Mark Spier from Maryland. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Cuboid syndrome is a common cause of lateral foot pain, which is pain on the outside of the foot. The condition may happen suddenly due to an ankle sprain, or it may develop slowly overtime from repetitive tension through the bone and surrounding structures.

Causes

The most common causes of cuboid syndrome include:

  • Injury – The most common cause of this ailment is an ankle sprain.
  • Repetitive Strain – Tension placed through the peroneus longus muscle from repetitive activities such as jumping and running may cause excessive traction on the bone causing it to sublux.
  • Altered Foot Biomechanics – Most people suffering from cuboid subluxation have flat feet.

Symptoms

A common symptom of cuboid syndrome is pain along the outside of the foot which can be felt in the ankle and toes. This pain may create walking difficulties and may cause those with the condition to walk with a limp.

Diagnosis

Diagnosis of cuboid syndrome is often difficult, and it is often misdiagnosed. X-rays, MRIs and CT scans often fail to properly show the cuboid subluxation. Although there isn’t a specific test used to diagnose cuboid syndrome, your podiatrist will usually check if pain is felt while pressing firmly on the cuboid bone of your foot.

Treatment

Just as the range of causes varies widely, so do treatments. Some more common treatments are ice therapy, rest, exercise, taping, and orthotics.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Columbia, Reisterstown, and Locust Point, MD. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

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Thursday, 12 March 2020 00:00

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Monday, 09 March 2020 00:00

If a wound has developed on your foot, it’s extremely important that you identify which kind of wound it is and take the necessary steps to ensure it heals safely and properly. Oftentimes, wounds go unnoticed on the feet, which is why you should check them daily for any abnormalities. Some common types of wounds that can form include scrapes, abrasions, cuts, or puncture wounds. To care for your wounds, you should begin by washing the affected area with soap and water, followed by thoroughly drying the feet. An antibiotic ointment should then be applied, followed by fully covering the wound. If you find the damaged area has not stopped bleeding after a few hours, professional help should be sought, as stitches may be required. If you also experience redness, swelling, pain, drainage from the wound, or develop a fever, you should seek professional care, as this may be signs that the wound has become infected. In order to safely treat any wounds of the feet, consult with a podiatrist for professional care and an advised plan of action.

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with Dr. Mark Spier from Maryland. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Columbia, Reisterstown, and Locust Point, MD. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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