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Columbia | Reisterstown | Baltimore

Monday, 20 May 2019 00:00

The treatment and recovery for a broken ankle depends on the doctor’s specific diagnosis. For a stable ankle break, you may need to use crutches in order to keep weight off of the injury. You also may need to wear a boot or a cast. An unstable break, on the other hand, will typically require surgery. Both those with stable and unstable ankle breaks usually need to attend physical therapy. The recovery varies on the injury and the surgery. The time to return to low-impact athletic activity can span from three to four months for a stable ankle break, and nine months to one year for unstable ankle breaks. Be sure to consult with a podiatrist on the particular details of your ankle injury.

Broken ankles need immediate treatment. If you are seeking treatment, contact Dr. Mark Spier from Maryland. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet. 

Broken Ankles
A broken ankle is experienced when a person fractures their tibia or fibula in the lower leg and ankle area. Both of these bones are attached at the bottom of the leg and combine to form what we know to be our ankle.

When a physician is referring to a break of the ankle, he or she is usually referring to a break in the area where the tibia and fibula are joined to create our ankle joint. Ankles are more prone to fractures because the ankle is an area that suffers a lot of pressure and stress. There are some obvious signs when a person experiences a fractured ankle, and the following symptoms may be present.

Symptoms of a Fractured Ankle

  • Excessive pain when the area is touched or when any pressure is placed on the ankle
  •  Swelling around the area
  •  Bruising of the area
  • Area appears to be deformed

If you suspect an ankle fracture, it is recommended to seek treatment as soon as possible. The sooner you have your podiatrist diagnose the fracture, the quicker you’ll be on the way towards recovery.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Columbia, Reisterstown, and Locus Point, MD. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about All About Broken Ankles
Friday, 17 May 2019 00:00

If left untreated, an ingrown toenail can lead to greater issues. Give us a call, and get treated!

Monday, 13 May 2019 00:00

The feet bear the weight of the body throughout the day, and it is important to properly take care of them. This includes practicing frequent foot stretches which may reduce common aches and pains in the feet. An effective stretch for the arch is done by rolling your foot on a tennis ball, and this is helpful in relaxing the muscles. The toes can be strengthened by standing on tiptoes for several seconds, followed by standing flat on the ground. The toes will feel refreshed when this stretching technique is repeated a few times. An additional stretch for the toes is accomplished by interlocking your fingers through your toes while gently rolling the ankle in circles. This is beneficial in strengthening the joints in the ankle. If you would like additional information about how stretching can benefit the feet, please consult with a podiatrist.

Stretching the feet is a great way to prevent injuries. If you have any concerns with your feet consult with Dr. Mark Spier from Maryland. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Stretching the Feet

Stretching the muscles in the foot is an important part in any physical activity. Feet that are tight can lead to less flexibility and make you more prone to injury. One of the most common forms of foot pain, plantar fasciitis, can be stretched out to help ease the pain. Stretching can not only ease pain from plantar fasciitis but also prevent it as well. However, it is important to see a podiatrist first if stretching is right for you. Podiatrists can also recommend other ways to stretch your feet. Once you know whether stretching is right for you, here are some excellent stretches you can do.

  • Using a foam roller or any cylindrical object (a water bottle or soda can will do), roll the object under your foot back and forth. You should also exert pressure on the object. Be sure to do this to both feet for a minute. Do this exercise three times each.
  • Similar to the previous one, take a ball, such as a tennis ball, and roll it under your foot while seated and exert pressure on it.
  • Grab a resistance band or towel and take a seat. If you are using a towel, fold it length wise. Next put either one between the ball of your foot and heel and pull with both hands on each side towards you. Hold this for 15 seconds and then switch feet. Do this three times for each foot.
  • Finally hold your big toe while crossing one leg over the other. Pull the toe towards you and hold for 15 seconds. Once again do this three times per foot.

It is best to go easy when first stretching your foot and work your way up. If your foot starts hurting, stop exercising and ice and rest the foot. It is advised to then see a podiatrist for help.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Columbia, Reisterstown, and Locus Point, MD. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about How to Stretch Your Feet
Monday, 06 May 2019 00:00

The location of a plantar wart is on the sole of the foot. It often develops in the heel area of the foot and grows into the skin. This is a result of consistent weight that is put on the heel while walking or standing. The fungus that causes this type of wart is known as the human papillomavirus (HPV) and is considered to be contagious. Some of the symptoms that are associated with this condition include a hard and callused area on the heel of the foot, and pain while bearing weight on the foot. Additionally, clotted blood vessels will often appear in the center, which look like tiny black dots. This type of fungus thrives in warm and moist places, which include public swimming pools and surrounding areas, and can easily spread by sharing socks or towels. If you would like information about proper treatment options for a plantar’s wart, please counsel with a podiatrist.

Plantar warts can be very uncomfortable. If you need your feet checked, contact Dr. Mark Spier from Maryland. Our doctor will assist you with all of your foot and ankle needs.

About Plantar Warts

Plantar warts are the result of HPV, or human papillomavirus, getting into open wounds on the feet. They are mostly found on the heels or balls of the feet.

While plantar warts are generally harmless, those experiencing excessive pain or those suffering from diabetes or a compromised immune system require immediate medical care. Plantar warts are easily diagnosed, usually through scraping off a bit of rough skin or by getting a biopsy.

Symptoms

  • Lesions on the bottom of your feet, usually rough and grainy
  • Hard or thick callused spots
  • Wart seeds, which are small clotted blood vessels that look like little black spots
  • Pain, discomfort, or tenderness of your feet when walking or standing

Treatment

  • Freezing
  • Electric tool removal
  • Laser Treatment
  • Topical Creams (prescription only)
  • Over-the-counter medications

To help prevent developing plantar warts, avoid walking barefoot over abrasive surfaces that can cause cuts or wounds for HPV to get into. Avoiding direct contact with other warts, as well as not picking or rubbing existing warts, can help prevent the further spread of plantar warts. However, if you think you have developed plantar warts, speak to your podiatrist. He or she can diagnose the warts on your feet and recommend the appropriate treatment options.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Columbia, Reisterstown, and Locus Point, MD. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Plantar Warts
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